The State-of-the-Art in Linguistics in 2017: An Iranian View

Dr. Mohammad Dabir-Moghaddam,

AllamehTabataba'i University (& Academy of Persian Language and Literature), Iran

 

In this talk, I intend to provide a state-of-the-art review of the basic tenets, assumptions, and concerns of the four major approaches to the study of human language. These approaches are as follows: The Generative Enterprise, Systemic Functional Grammar, Cognitive Linguistics, and Linguistic Typology. I will then rely on my own research on Persian and other Iranian languages of Iran to assess the major claims of the mentioned approaches to the study of language. This talk will reveal my own theoretical concerns and assumptions about the architecture of language. In my research on Ancient and Modern Iranian languages, I have arrived at the following results: (A) Form and structure do play a crucial role in the architecture and design of these languages and more generally and analogically in the architecture of human languages: The existence of the syntactic domains; (B) Though I assume the modularity of language and mind, I am convinced that the very existence of options, choices, and variations that are allowed by languages are due to pragmatic, discoursal, and information structure factors: Mobile clitics; (C) The results reported in (A) and (B) suggest that a modular and interface-based model of language which allows the interdependence of form, meaning, and function, hence a formal-functional view of language seems to be more compatible with the real, authentic, and corpus-based data; (D) Synchrony may reveal decisive data and information on archaic patterns and structures and the processes of language change and on the notion of endangerment; (E) How much do we benefit from the theoretical developments and theoretical state-of-the-art in the field for applied purposes and more specifically in language teaching?

 

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

The Application of Diminutives in the Translation of Texts: A Case Study of German Semantics in Translation

Dr. Bisserka Veleva,

Sofia University, Bulgaria

 

This research has the aim to round out andto specify the essential characteristics of the semantic category diminutionin some textual productions and summaries, necessary to conduct the assessment of the diminutive nounsin contrastive pattern between the Bulgarian as Slavic languageand the German as Germanic language. The study has the implications to the phonological, word-structure and grammar features of the both languages. However, the focus had been turned towards the functional use of deminutives in the texts and their further generalization as a semantic category. The main purpose of this presentation is to underlie the main guidelines and tendencies, to highlight the general and diverse specifications and peculiarities, which are required as a theoretical and methodological platform for the contrastive analysis in the diminution, to suggest answers to the raised questions, to make necessary conclusions and generalizations regarding the conceptual component of the category diminution in the contrastive intra-linguistic aspect.

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

On The Etymology of the Names Astaraand Astarabad

Dr. Vugar Sultanzade,

Eastern Mediterranean University, Cyprus

 

The article deals with the origin of the wordsAstara and Astarabad(now Gorgan), that are the names of the towns located at the southwestern and southeastern corners of Caspian Sea, respectively. The etymology of the toponymAstara is generally explained by the geographical location of the city. Many researchers argues that Astara means ‘lowland’ because of the Old Turkic word ast ‘low’. Some argue that the etymology of the name Astara relates to the tribe As. According to the third opinion, Astara is a Talish name, etymologically consisting of the words h(osto) ‘plain; smooth’ and ro ‘road’. As for the etymology of the name Astarabad, “one tradition connects it with Yazīd and says that he founded it on the site of the village of Astarak (other popular etymologies connect the town’s name with the Persian word setāra (star) or astar(mule)” (Bosworth, Blair). All above-mentioned etymologies are disputable. To our opinion, the etymology of these related toponyms of Caspian regionis connected with the goddess known under names Ishtar (Babylonian mythology), Astarta/ Astarte (Greek), Astara (Persian) and Astar, Ishdar, Istaru (other languages). In ancient times, the cult of this goddess was very popular in the mentioned region. The paper explains the reasons why this etymology is convincing.

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

Geocriticism: Reading Literature in Space

Dr. Manfred Malzahn,

United Arab Emirates University, UAE

 

Among recent currents in the field of literary studies, geocriticism has emerged asbeing probably the most promising, arguably the most accommodating, and—paradoxically—the most traditional of innovations. This paper will seek to illuminate the nature and the potential of a critical approach that continues previous and that challenges contemporary critical theories and practices. The argument will be supported by examples drawn largely, if not exclusively from Scottish literature and culture, used in an attempt to illustrate the praticularinterrelatedness between natural environment, built environment, and community that has shaped and is shaping the multiple selves of Scotland and its people.

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

Non-verbal Signals in Qura'nic Discourse

Dr. Muayyad Omran Chiad,

University of Kerbala, Iraq

 

Non-verbal Signals refer to the movements when human beings use to communicate with each other without speech or writing. They are important in communication as face-to-face conversation if not take the limelight from it. However, more research is necessary to confirm this point. This paper is an attempt to discusses the non-verbal signals by analysing, characterizing them and then exploring how it manifests itself in the Holy Qura'n.The paper shows that the Quranic discourse is abundant with verbal Signals which are useful to understand the speaker's inclination to a great degree. They are considered important in the Qura'nic discourse, therefore Almighty God enriches the verbal message to make it more persuasive and understandable for the addressees. 

 

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First International Conference on Current Issues of Languages, Dialects and Linguistics (WWW.LLLD.IR) & The Third National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 2-3 February 2017 , Iran-Ahwaz.

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