How Test Candidates' Motivation Mediates Test Washback: The Case of M.A Entrance Exam

Dr. Kioumars Razavipour & Mahboobeh Mansoori

Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz

The influences tests have on education, washback, has been the subject of much scholarly work over the last couple of decades. Many aspects of language education including teaching methods, teaching content, test factors and textbooks have been investigated. Yet, how learners and their characteristics might mediate test washback has not been the subject of much research. This study investigates how test takers' motivation and the value they accord to test design and uses mediate their test preparation practices. A hundred M.A TEFL candidates responded to two questionnaires; one on test preparation and the other on their perceptions of test use and design. Data analyzed through structural equation modeling revealed that expectancy value theory accounts to a large extent for patterns of variation in the test preparation practices. Implications the results carry for test construction and test preparation are further discussed.

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The Second National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 5-4 February 2016 , Iran-Ahwaz.

The Effect of Anonymity of Bloggers on Writing Skill

Dr. Zohre G. Shooshtari, Fatemeh Rezaee & Majid Samiee

Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Islamic Azad University of Shahreza

 

The present study sought to investigate pseudonym-based blog writing and its impact on writing performance. It focused on whether anonymity can be a key strategy to decline learners' anxiety and lead to a greater progress in writing production. Data from 28 junior students of ELT from Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz attending an essay writing course was gathered through pre and posttests and a motivation questionnaire. The participants were assigned to two groups of anonymous and nonanonymous. One group was writing under pseudonyms and the other one under real names on their personal weblogs. The results reflected a remarkable progress in the writing skill of each group. However, no direct relationship was found between anonymous weblogging and writing improvement in terms of the five writing components of Brown's scale (2005). The findings as well implied the applicability of pseudonyms in blog-assisted writing instruction to soften learners' negative attitudes towards writing and enhance their motivation in writing practice.

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The Second National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 5-4 February 2016 , Iran-Ahwaz.

Linguistic Landscape in Iran: The Cases of Shiraz and Ahvaz (A Work in Progress)

Mina Homayouni & Dr. Kiomars Razavipour

Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz

 

Linguistic landscape (LL) constitutes all the visual and textual signs displayed in public spaces. These linguistic signs serve two fundamental functions: informational and symbolic. Regarding the information gained from these two functions, one can discover real nature of language policies and their reflection in practice. On the other hand, linguistic ideologies of every individual can be a crucial factor in the language or languages displayed in public sphere. Also, the trend of globalization is considered to be of importance to the linguistic studies. To date, many studies have addressed the linguistic landscape of cities across the globe. Yet, LL remains under-explored in our country. Using a mixed method approach, we are studying the LL of some select streets in Ahvaz and Shiraz. To this end, we collect data from both the city space and the individuals involved in decision making about the signs. Descriptive and inferential statistics as well as qualitative procedures are used in the analysis of the data. Seemingly remote but the study does have implications for ELT community and language policy makers alike.

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The Second National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 5-4 February 2016 , Iran-Ahwaz.

The Place of Genre in Translation Studies

Dr. Zahra Amirian, University of Isfahan

 

Swales’ (1984/1990) working definition of genre has significantly contributed to language teaching (Swales, 1990, Bhatia, 1993) and translation studies (Hatim and Mason, 1990; García Izquierdo, 2005). Specific textual structures imposed by the writers on texts are determined by conventionalized forms or established genres within a given culture. “The achievement of genre is a necessary and integral part of writing: the two are inextricably interwoven” (Kress, 1994, p. 100). In the same vein, the concept of genre is an integral component of the translation process. The place of genre in the acquisition of translation competence has repeatedly been examined by researchers (Montalt, 2003; Montalt, Ezpeleta and García de Toro, 2005; García Izquierdo, 2005). According to Kelly (2002/2005), translation competence is a multifaceted concept consisting of “communicative and textual”, “cultural”, “thematic”, “instrumental”, “psycho-physiological”, “interpersonal” and “strategic” sub-competencies, which are all necessary for the fulfillment of the macro-competence (2002, p. 14-15). The purpose of the present study is to pinpoint the status of genre in translation studies. It attempts to investigate how genre awareness may improve the translator’s professional competence and how it can be manipulated for training translators. The results of this study may provide implications for translation and translator training courses.

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 5-6 March 2015 , Iran-Ahwaz.

Gender-Oriented Code Switching of Iranian EFL Teachers: A Case Study

Dr. Saeed Ghaniabadi, Hakim Sabzevari University

 

This paper aims to explore the relationship between code switching and gender among Iranian EFL teachers in Sabzevar English institutes. The study was conducted using instruments that measured how gender affects code-switching. The study involves a mixed method design (Creswell & Plano, 2007) which includes collecting quantitative data as well as the qualitative data. The primary data are quantitative; the qualitative data were designed to help explain the quantitative results in order to make the research more sufficient. In order to investigate the effect of gender on code-switching and to best answer the research questions, classroom observations and teacher interviews were employed for a quantitative method analysis. The results showed that code-switching is much more common among female teachers. This cannot be concluded as their lack of proficiency; since Persian is always a language to be shared by all the participants, the teachers are motivated to spend less time on resorting to code-switching instead of retrieval.

The above abstract is part  of the article which was accepted at The First National Conference on English Studies and Linguistics (WWW.ELTL.IR) , 5-6 March 2015 , Iran-Ahwaz.

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